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Othello’s Island, SAMLA, SFS | The Scrivener

By April 5, 2015 No Comments

Greetings! Thanks for reading The Scrivener, your place for the latest news in Shakespeare scholarship. There are a number of great new calls for papers and conferences that have crossed my desk this week, so let’s get to it!

Othello’s Island

Othello's Island, SAMLA, SFS | The Scrivener shakespeare news The Shakespeare Standard theshakespearestandard.com shakespeare plays list play shakespeare The 4th Annual Multidisciplinary Conference of Medieval and Renaissance Studies is being held at the Severis Foundation in Cyprus. Organizers aim “to bring together academics, researchers and research students covering a wide range of topics relating to the Medieval and Renaissance periods, including art historians, social and economic historians, museum curators, archaeologists, literary historians.”

 “We would also welcome suggestions from individuals or groups for parallel strands and semi-autonomous conferences which might share some of the plenary sessions and social elements of the event. For example, a strand dealing specifically with Shakespeare and the Mediterranean might be big enough to require its own semi-autonomous event alongside the one we are organizing.”

For more information, including details on how to participate in the new Guided Poster Sessions, see the full call here.

SAMLA

The South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference is featuring a panel on Literature and Science in Early Modern England. From the call:

This panel welcomes papers on the various social, intellectual, or textual networks among authors and consumers of early modern literature and science. This panel seeks to understand what new networks of influence or collaboration we can discover by pairing disparate genres/fields of inquiry in the early modern period. Essentially, this panel asks: how can disparate or shared methods of signification within literary and scientific genres challenge our understanding of the early modern production of knowledge? Suggested topics include fictional representations of scientific communities, processes of experimentation both in literature and in contemporary practice, printers and publishers of fiction and science, generic divides between scientific and literary representations of methods, or figures and contemporary discourse surrounding the role of the scientific author. By June 1, 2015, please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Katherine Walker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at walkerkn@email.unc.edu.

ACMRS

The Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has announced their 2016 conference. Papers that explore any topic related to the study and teaching of the Middle Ages and Renaissance and especially those that focus on the general theme of “Marginal Figures in the Global Middle Ages and Renaissance” are welcomed. Selected paper will be considered for publication in a conference volume of the Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance series. For more details visit the conference website here.

French Shakespeare Society

Othello's Island, SAMLA, SFS | The Scrivener shakespeare news The Shakespeare Standard theshakespearestandard.com shakespeare plays list play shakespeare On the occasion of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the Société Française Shakespeare is dedicating its annual conference to “Shakespeare after Shakespeare”. The conference will be the occasion for academics, theater, performance and arts practitioners to discuss the playwright’s long-lasting legacy.

We welcome proposals (in English or in French) on topics such as:

  • Shakespearean adaptations and appropriations from the 17th to the 21st century in print, in paintings, on stage, or in the media, new and old (radio, film, television, comics, Internet…)

  • The posthumous reputation and portrayals of Shakespeare: how has ‘Shakespeare’ been portrayed after his death?

  • The issue of serial writing and directing: dramatic links from one play to the next; productions presented as sequels or prequels.

  • Dramatic and poetic aesthetics after Shakespeare: what does it mean to write poetry or drama after Shakespeare?

  • Recapturing the ‘original’ Shakespeare post-facto: his work, the creative process, the publishing process, the staging and pronunciation of his plays…

  • Studying Shakespeare’s works from the viewpoint of contemporary theories of language and literature: how does Shakespeare help us to create new concepts or review old ones?

To see the full call please visit here.

Shakespeare and Education

The University of Brighton is hosting a conference on Shakespeare and Education. per the announcement:

2016 will mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, provoking renewed interest in his work, his legacy and his contemporary cultural capital. As teaching methods change, pedagogy develops, technologies advance and culture evolves, what role does Shakespeare play now and in the future of teaching and learning? How do we incorporate performance practice in the teaching of Shakespeare in Literature – and vice versa? What part does education play in the construction of our public ‘memory’ of Shakespeare at this time of commemoration?

Proposals for 20 minute papers or practical workshops are particularly welcome on the following topics:

• Shakespeare and broadcast media / Digital Shakespeares.

• Integrating performance practice in teaching Shakespeare in literature courses.

• Leaving Shakespeare out: the case for not studying Shakespeare.

• Shakespeare and the educational trip, literary tourism, theatre reconstruction.

• Re-writing Shakespeare in the classroom: creative writing and dramatic practice.

• Shakespeare and educational transitions: exploring the challenges and possibilities of Shakespeare as a rare constant in education across levels, widely taught from primary to postgraduate.

• Shakespeare and education policy: determining the curriculum and the canon?

• Commemoration and education – approaching anniversaries and the effects of constructions of public memory on student experience of learning.

For more information see the full call here.

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